“Luciano Fabro: Bitter Sweets for Nadezhda Mandelstam”

“Luciano Fabro: Bitter Sweets for Nadezhda Mandelstam” in The Taste of Art: Cooking, Food, and Counterculture in Contemporary Practices (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas press, 2017).

The Taste of Art examines the role of food in Western contemporary art practices. The contributors are scholars from a range of disciplines, including art history, philosophy, film studies, and history. Artists include: Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Daniel Spoerri, Dieter Roth, Joseph Beuys, Al Ruppersberg, Alison Knowles, Martha Rosler, Robin Weltsch, Vicki Hodgetts, Paul McCarthy, Luciano Fabro, Carries Mae Weems, Peter Fischli and David Weiss, Janine Antoni, Elżbieta Jabłońska, Liza Lou, Tom Marioni, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Michael Rakowitz, and Natalie Jeremijenko.

“Everywhere and Nowhere: Medardo Rosso and the Cultural Cosmopolitan in Fin-de siècle Paris”

“Everywhere and Nowhere: Medardo Rosso and the Cultural Cosmopolitan in Fin-de siècle Paris” in S. Waller and K. Carter, eds. Strangers in Paradise: Foreign Artists and Communities in Modern Paris, 1870-1914 (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2014).

An essay that examines Medardo Rosso’s initial year in Paris. While the Italian sculptor would eventually forge a sense of cosmopolitanism, his early efforts to establish personal contacts with dealers and critics were undermined by his artistic intransigence and the obstacles faced by modern sculptors, as well as the difficulties of penetrating the apparently open yet insular French art scene.

Read more here
Download Review 1, Review 2, Review 3, Review4

“Cracking the Code, What Leonardo da Vinci Can Show us About Teaching Art History in Today’s Study-Abroad Setting”

“Cracking the Code, What Leonardo da Vinci Can Show us About Teaching Art History in Today’s Study-Abroad Setting”, in C. Ramsay Portolano, ed. The Future of Italian Teaching (Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars, 2014)

 An essay that proposes a series of new teaching strategies for art history in the study abroad setting. The essay is based on a successful, interactive course devoted to Leonardo da Vinci in Milan called “Cracking the Code”, designed and taught by Hecker

“Markets, Bacchanals and Gallows’: Luciano Fabro’s Italia all’asta in Piazza Plebiscito in Naples (2004)”

“Markets, Bacchanals and Gallows’: Luciano Fabro’s Italia all’asta in Piazza Plebiscito in Naples (2004)” in A. Nova and S. Hanke, eds. Platzanlagen und ihre Monumente: Wechselwirkungen zwischen Skulptur und Stadtraum (Berlin: Deutscher Kunstverlag, 2014)

This essay examines the contradictory role, meaning, and public reception of a contemporary art monument in the piazza setting through a study of a sculptural installation by Arte povera artist Luciano Fabro, made for the Piazza del Plebiscito in Naples in 2004.

Read more here

“Who Calls me Villain? The Italian Professor Facing the American Student Evaluation Process”

“Who Calls me Villain? The Italian Professor Facing the American Student Evaluation Process”, in M. Capovilla, A. Faggi, C. Zaiontz, eds, Culture shock? Studenti statunitensi in Italia: una sfida transculturale (Milan: Franco Angeli Editore, 2012): 143-157

Hecker discusses the divergent responses to the use of teaching evaluations and their effectiveness for Italian teachers in the study abroad setting. She proposes fresh ways to utilize and to interpret the evaluations in order to make them more effective for foreign teachers.

“Art is Glimpsed. Luciano Fabro’s Penelope”

“Art is Glimpsed. Luciano Fabro’s Penelope”, in J. Hirsh and I. Wallace, eds., Contemporary Art/Classical Myth (London: Ashgate, 2011): 57-86

An essay that explores Luciano Fabro’s Penelope, a work first created on the occasion of the 1972 Venice Biennale, as an artistic critique that undermines traditional assumptions about this mythological character as a passive persona. Hecker’s analysis shows how Fabro’s work foreground’s Penelope’s agency as well as the critical role of the spectator, whose own sensorial experience, like that of Penelope and Ulysses, is essential to understanding the power of this myth and indeed all creative acts.

Read more here

“Shattering the Mould: Medardo Rosso and the Poetics of Plaster”

“Shattering the Mould: Medardo Rosso and the Poetics of Plaster” in R. Frederiksen and E. Marchand, eds., Plaster Casts: Making, Collecting and Displaying from Classical Antiquity to the Present (Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2010): 319-330.

An essay that discusses plaster in the work of Medardo Rosso (1858–1928) and his provocative uses of the material in original artworks, often in combination with wax and even with bronze. Hecker places Rosso’s unorthodox adoption of this material within a break with the neo-classical uses of plaster for casting and copying. She contends that Rosso drew on modern tastes for cheaper materials that became part of a new language of avant-garde sculpture. 

Read more here

“Fleeting Revelations, The Demise of Duration in Medardo Rosso’s Wax Sculpture”

“Fleeting Revelations, The Demise of Duration in Medardo Rosso’s Wax Sculpture” in Ephemeral Bodies: Wax Sculpture and the Human Figure, R. Panzanelli, ed., Getty Research Institute Issues and Debates Book Series (Los Angeles: J.P. Getty Trust, 2008): 131-153.

An essay that explores the connotations of wax in Medardo Rosso’s sculpture. Hecker contends that in Rosso’s nearly-dissolving sculptures, wax embodies dissolution of flesh and form, as well as softness, and morbidity, in defiance of the conventional purity and durability of the plastic arts. Hecker sees wax as a material that forms a dialectic between maker and material, between the sculptor’s identity as plastic form-giver and the work’s own material capacity to disintegrate.